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February 14, 2017
When Should You Get Your Kid A Phone?
IT'S NOT A QUESTION OF THE RIGHT AGE
- - It’s a rite of passage for parents of tweens: By the time your child is 10 or 12, she decides that she must have a cell phone, because if she can’t text and talk to her friends her social life will be “ruined.” You may be skeptical about that, but the idea has some appeal to you, too: As she begins to become independent, you want to be able to keep in touch with her, especially if she has started traveling alone.

February 14, 2017
When Your Daughter's Worry Is Something More
"Young girls often cannot identify their feelings. Anxiety might be felt as jitteriness, a sick stomach, excessive worry, headaches, insomnia, nightmares, or general feelings of not being well." What to look for in your daughter

February 14, 2017
How to Stay In Control: Let Your Kid Have The Last Word

Ending a heated conversation with your child can be tricky. The next time you are in this situation, ask yourself: Have I made my point? What would happen if I ended the conversation and walked away? Kids are masters at keeping an argument going. Walking away from the discussion and letting them have the last word is hard to do!

Life is a journey and sometimes we need guidance, someone to help show us the way, or just to help us see the way. The way that is there before us but we just can't quite see...a little nudge here...a little suggestion there.

Some guidance...to make it become clear, to make it easier, to make it better. Guidance to help us be better to our friends, to our family, to ourselves, and most importantly...to our children.

 

 Skipper L Harvey, PsyD     

 

 

Did you know?

Let’s face it…all children misbehave sometimes. One of the questions that we frequently ask ourselves when our children are engaging in unwanted behaviors is, “Why?” A child’s behavior almost always serves some type of purpose for that child; however, when you find yourself with more questions than answers it may be time to consider a more serious condition such as Oppositional Defiant Disorder or ODD. ODD is defined by a recurrent pattern of developmentally inappropriate levels of negativistic, defiant, disobedient, and hostile behavior toward authority figures. Children with this disorder are best served by a licensed mental health professional who can provide both individual and family therapy.

ODD - A Guide For Families